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2021 Ford Mustang

2021 Ford Mustang

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$27,155 — $51,720 MSRP
57
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Coupe
2-4 Seats
17-24 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
 — 
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2021 Ford Mustang exterior side view

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2021 Ford Mustang Review

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

By Cars.com

After a break of 17 years, the Ford Mustang Mach 1 is roaring back onto the muscle-car scene with a 480-horsepower, 5.0-liter V-8 under its hood, plus plenty of parts taken from the mighty Shelby GT350 and GT500 — carrying a just-announced price rolling up on $53,000 when it arrives at dealerships in the spring. Time has been kind to the Mach 1 because when it was last offered for the 2004 model year, it was powered by a 305-hp, 4.6-liter V-8. With exactly 175 more ponies than its predecessor, the 2021 Mustang Mach 1 is aimed directly at rivals like the Chevrolet Camaro SS and Dodge Challenger R/T.

Related: This Pony’s Goin’ to the Glue Factory: Last Ride for Ford Mustang Shelby GT350

But wait, doesn’t the regular Mustang GT already have a potent 460-hp V-8 engine? And come to think of it, the Mustang Bullitt has exactly the same 480 hp and 420 pounds-feet of torque that you get in the new Mach 1. What makes the Mach 1 stand out among other high-performance ’Stangs, not to mention bitter rivals from Chevy and Dodge?

Exterior

To start, the Mach 1 plays on the model’s long history in the Mustang lineup. The first Mach 1 arrived in 1969 and, as you can see, wild racing stripes and a blacked-out hood are retro design elements found on the 2021 Mach 1. Honoring that heritage, a Mach 1 buyer has the choice of three reflective accent stripes — red, white or orange — alongside the satin-black side stripes and hood.

Also harking back to the original 1969 model, the Mach 1’s front grille...

After a break of 17 years, the Ford Mustang Mach 1 is roaring back onto the muscle-car scene with a 480-horsepower, 5.0-liter V-8 under its hood, plus plenty of parts taken from the mighty Shelby GT350 and GT500 — carrying a just-announced price rolling up on $53,000 when it arrives at dealerships in the spring. Time has been kind to the Mach 1 because when it was last offered for the 2004 model year, it was powered by a 305-hp, 4.6-liter V-8. With exactly 175 more ponies than its predecessor, the 2021 Mustang Mach 1 is aimed directly at rivals like the Chevrolet Camaro SS and Dodge Challenger R/T.

Related: This Pony’s Goin’ to the Glue Factory: Last Ride for Ford Mustang Shelby GT350

But wait, doesn’t the regular Mustang GT already have a potent 460-hp V-8 engine? And come to think of it, the Mustang Bullitt has exactly the same 480 hp and 420 pounds-feet of torque that you get in the new Mach 1. What makes the Mach 1 stand out among other high-performance ’Stangs, not to mention bitter rivals from Chevy and Dodge?

Exterior

To start, the Mach 1 plays on the model’s long history in the Mustang lineup. The first Mach 1 arrived in 1969 and, as you can see, wild racing stripes and a blacked-out hood are retro design elements found on the 2021 Mach 1. Honoring that heritage, a Mach 1 buyer has the choice of three reflective accent stripes — red, white or orange — alongside the satin-black side stripes and hood.

Also harking back to the original 1969 model, the Mach 1’s front grille is finished in a deep black mesh pattern, with a pair of fake headlights worked into the design. According to Ford, the Tarnished Dark-painted alloy wheels (19 inches front and rear) are a modern interpretation of the classic Mach 1’s Magnum 500 style wheels. There are eight exterior color choices: Race Red, Velocity Blue, Oxford White, Grabber Yellow, Shadow Black, Iconic Silver, Twister Orange and the Mach 1-exclusive Fighter Jet Gray with the available Appearance Package.

Transmission and Performance Features

There’s much more to this Mustang than racing stripes and fancy wheels, of course. In addition to the growling V-8 engine, Mach 1 customers can choose between a six-speed manual transmission or optional 10-speed automatic. The manual gearbox is taken directly from the Shelby GT350 and comes with features like rev-matching, its own dedicated oil-cooling system and a short-throw shifter. Automatic Mach 1 models also include a transmission oil cooler and upgraded torque converter.

A big deciding factor in your transmission choice could be the available Handling Package. This is offered exclusively with the six-speed manual gearbox and includes wider wheels, a larger front splitter, rear spoiler with integrated Gurney flap, and subtle aerodynamic changes borrowed from the Mustang Shelby stable to improve airflow around the front and rear wheels.

The effect is greater drag to keep the Mach 1 planted to the road (or track) at high speed. Ford says the Mach 1 in standard format has 22% more downforce than a Mustang GT equipped with the Performance Pack 1 option package. Jump to the Mach 1 with the Handling Package, and Ford estimates downforce is a whopping 150% more than what you get in that same Mustang GT. If you plan on taking your Ford pony car to a racetrack, this added aero grip will be your new best friend in high-speed corners.

The suspension and steering have been upgraded with features like stiffer sway bars and front springs, stiffer bushings in the rear subframe and a rear toe link taken from the Shelby GT500. Other racetrack-friendly hardware on the Mach 1 include two side heat exchangers to help better cool the engine and transmission, along with a rear-axle cooling system and a more aggressive lower rear diffuser borrowed from the Shelby GT500 (because let’s admit that if you’re going to start borrowing things, a Mustang with 760 hp is a good place to start).

Pricing and Release Date

Last, but hardly least, we come to the Mach 1’s price tag. When it arrives in spring 2021, the Mach 1 will cost $52,915 (including $1,195 destination fee). That’s about $5,000 more than what you’d pay for a 2020 Mustang Bullitt, though it’s roughly $7,000 less than the current cost of a Shelby GT350.

The world of very fast Ford Mustangs is becoming an increasingly crowded place … and, nope, we’re not complaining.

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

5
1 review — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(5.0)
Performance
(5.0)
Interior Design
(5.0)
Comfort
(5.0)
Reliability
(5.0)
Value For The Money
(5.0)
(5.0)

best car ever made

by WILLIAM from LONDON,UK on November 3, 2020

this car met all my needs.it has a very nice engine.this is an best american muscle car that ever made. it has a nice body. Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2021 Ford Mustang currently has 0 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

Based on 2021 Ford Mustang EcoBoost

NHTSA rates vehicles using a star rating system from 1-5 stars, with 5 being the highest.

Overall
5 Star
Overall Front
5 Star
Overall Side
5 Star
Overall Rollover Rating
5 Star
Driver's
5 Star
Passenger's
5 Star
Side Barrier
5 Star
Side Barrier Rating Driver
5 Star
Side Barrier Rating Passenger Rear Seat
5 Star
Side Pole
5 Star
Side Pole Barrier combined (Front)
5 Star
Side Pole Barrier combined (Rear)
5 Star
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is part of the U.S. Department of Transportation. NHTSA provides vehicle safety information such as front- and side-crash ratings and rollover ratings. Vehicles are rated using a star rating system from 1-5 stars, with 5 being the highest.

Warranty

New car and certified pre-owned programs by Ford

New Car Program Benefits

  • Bumper-to-Bumper

    36 months / 36,000 miles

  • Powertrain

    60 months / 60,000 miles

  • Roadside Assistance

    60 months / 60,000 miles

Certified Pre-Owned Program Benefits

  • Maximum Age/Mileage

    Gold Certified: Ford models up to 6 years old with less than 80,000 miles Blue Certified: Fords and many non-Ford vehicles up to 10 years old with less than 120,000 miles Disclaimer: See your dealer for warranty coverage details.

  • Basic Warranty Terms

    Gold Certified: 12-Month/12,000-Mile (whichever comes first) Comprehensive Limited Warranty Blue Certified: 90-Day/4,000-Mile (whichever comes first) Comprehensive Limited Warranty Disclaimer: See your dealer for warranty coverage details.

  • Powertrain

    Gold Certified: 7-Year/100,000-Mile (whichever comes first) Powertrain Limited Warranty Blue Certified: Available Disclaimer: See your dealer for warranty coverage details.

  • Dealer Certification Required

    Gold Certified 172-point inspection Blue Certified 139-point inspection

  • Roadside Assistance

    Gold Certified: Yes (24/7 for 7 years) Blue Certified: Yes (24/7 for 90 days)

  • View All CPO Program Details

Latest 2021 Mustang Stories

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Mustang received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker

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