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Look Back in Anger: Ford, Lincoln SUV Recall for Faulty Rear Cameras Expands to 422,000

lincoln aviator 2020 02 exterior  front  grey jpg 2020 Lincoln Aviator | Cars.com photo by Mike Hanley

A recall saga for Ford that started in September 2021 and continued in January has now nearly doubled in size from the original guidance. Issues with rear cameras continue to plague the Ford Explorer and Lincoln Aviator and Corsair SUVs, now affecting more than 422,000 examples.

Related: More Recall News

The affected population includes model-year 2020-23 Explorers and Aviators and model-year 2020-22 Corsairs equipped with 360-degree camera systems, many of which had been thought repaired in the previous recalls. The video output may fail, preventing the rearview camera image from displaying. This reduces driver visibility and increases the risk of a crash.

A remedy is currently under development, but owners who’ve previously taken their vehicle in for a repair will need to do so again. Ford will begin notifying owners June 26, but those with further questions can call Ford at 866-436-7332 (Ford’s number for this recall is 23S23), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s vehicle-safety hotline at 888-327-4236, or visit its website to check their vehicle identification number and learn more.

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Patrick Masterson is Chief Copy Editor at Cars.com. He joined the automotive industry in 2016 as a lifelong car enthusiast and has achieved the rare feat of applying his journalism and media arts degrees as a writer, fact-checker, proofreader and editor his entire professional career. He lives by an in-house version of the AP stylebook and knows where semicolons can go. Email Patrick Masterson

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