Skip to main content

How Much Can Hybrid Pickups Tow?

ford f 150 platinum hybrid 2024 53 exterior front angle scaled jpg 2024 Ford F-150 | Cars.com photo by Melissa Klauda Winterland

Hybrid powertrains are synonymous in consumers’ minds with fuel-efficient cars and SUVs, but in recent years, automakers have expanded hybrid offerings to include pickup trucks. And while these hybrid pickups are typically more efficient, there are other benefits for consumers, as well: They may be more powerful than their gas-only counterparts or offer handy features to provide power to a jobsite, campsite or tailgate party. But are hybrid pickup trucks just as capable when it comes to traditional pickup duties like towing?

Related: 2024 Toyota Tacoma Hybrid Review: A Lot More Power, a Little More MPG

The specs below include the maximum towing capacities for hybrid and non-hybrid versions when properly equipped. We’ll say that again for emphasis: when properly equipped. One of the most common misconceptions around pickup trucks is that every version of a particular truck has the same maximum towing capacity, and that’s simply not true; trim level, engine, cab style, bed length, drivetrain and axle ratio all impact towing capacity. Owners should always know what their particular truck’s capabilities are; these can sometimes be found on a sticker on the driver’s side door jamb, or in a towing and trailering guide from the manufacturer.

Below is a list of model-year 2024 and 2025 pickup trucks and their maximum possible towing capacity when equipped with either a gas-electric hybrid or mild-hybrid powertrain, as well as the maximum towing capacity of a non-hybrid version.

Ford

ford maverick lariat hybrid 2022 05 exterior towing front angle scaled jpg 2022 Ford Maverick | Cars.com photo by Mike Hanley
  • 2024 Ford F-150 hybrid: 9,400 pounds
  • 2024 Ford F-150: 13,500 pounds
  • 2024 Ford Maverick hybrid: 2,000 pounds
  • 2024 Ford Maverick: 4,000 pounds

Ford is one of two automakers on this list to offer two hybrid pickup choices: The venerable half-ton F-150 is available with a hybrid powertrain, as is the compact Maverick. We’ve owned hybrid versions of both the F-150 and Maverick at Cars.com, with varying levels of enjoyment. The F-150 hybrid’s fuel economy disappointed, while the Maverick hybrid’s impressed. In both trucks, properly equipped non-hybrid versions can tow significantly more than their hybrid counterparts.

Ram

ram 1500 laramie 2025 44 exterior dynamic towing scaled jpg 2025 Ram 1500 Laramie | Cars.com photo by Christian Lantry
  • 2024 Ram 1500 eTorque V-8: 12,750 pounds
  • 2024 Ram 1500 eTorque V-6: 7,690 pounds
  • 2025 Ram 1500 eTorque V-6: 11,470 pounds
  • 2025 Ram 1500 H/O SST twin-turbo six-cylinder: 11,580 pounds

The 2024 Ram 1500 is an interesting vehicle on this list, as no version is available without a mild-hybrid powertrain; both the standard 3.6-liter V-6 and optional 5.7-liter V-8 are 48-volt mild hybrids, with a battery system providing assistance to the gas engine but no direct power to the wheels. The new 2025 Ram 1500, meanwhile, is still available with the mild-hybrid V-6, but its towing capacity increases dramatically. The V-8 is replaced by two twin-turbocharged inline-six-cylinder engines, and the non-hybrid H/O SST six-cylinder can tow slightly more than the mild-hybrid V-6, though not as much as the previous V-8.

Toyota

toyota tacoma i force max limited 2024 02 exterior front angle scaled jpg 2024 Toyota Tacoma Limited | Cars.com photo by Christian Lantry
  • 2024 Tacoma i-Force Max hybrid: 6,000 pounds
  • 2024 Tacoma i-Force: 6,500 pounds
  • 2024 Tundra i-Force Max hybrid: 11,450 pounds
  • 2024 Tundra i-Force: 12,000 pounds

Like Ford, Toyota has two hybrid pickups to choose from. The mid-size Tacoma and full-size Tundra are both available as gas-electric hybrids, but non-hybrid powertrains are standard. Unlike the Fords, the difference between each truck is much closer at just 500-550 pounds, rather than thousands, but that could still make a difference for towing-focused shoppers.

More From Cars.com:

Related Video:

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

Photo of Brian Normile
Road Test Editor Brian Normile joined the automotive industry and Cars.com in 2013, and he became part of the Editorial staff in 2014. Brian spent his childhood devouring every car magazine he got his hands on — not literally, eventually — and now reviews and tests vehicles to help consumers make informed choices. Someday, Brian hopes to learn what to do with his hands when he’s reviewing a car on camera. He would daily-drive an Alfa Romeo 4C if he could. Email Brian Normile

Featured stories

chinese ev tariffs 2024 exterior 01 jpg
lexus lexus rx 450h2B 2024 01 exterior front angle scaled jpg
toyota crown signia limited 2025 02 exterior profile red scaled jpg