Here’s How Much the 2021 Ford F-150 Costs

2021 Ford F-150

Ford didn’t make drastic styling changes to the F-150 pickup truck for its 2021 model-year redesign, but under the skin is an all-new available hybrid powertrain — with an all-electric version on the way — as well as a built-in generator, a reimagined interior, additional tech upgrades and some other nifty features. We also know pricing for the F-150’s six current trim levels, so let’s take a look at what each trim will cost and what you get for that. (Note, too, that all prices include a whopping $1,695 destination fee.)

Related: 2021 Ford F-150 Review: Keeping the Champion in Top Condition

2021 F-150 XL: $30,635

The base model F-150 is a regular-cab truck with a 6-foot-5-inch bed powered by Ford’s 3.3-liter V-6 paired to a 10-speed automatic transmission. Since it’s also a 4×2 truck, that power goes exclusively to the rear wheels. The standard features are an interesting mix of modern tech — like an 8-inch touchscreen, forward collision warning and automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection — along with a cloth 40/20/40 bench seat and crank windows.

2021 F-150 XLT: $36,745

Adding on to the XL’s content, the XLT gets power windows and door locks with keyless entry, a power-locking tailgate and additional safety tech, including blind spot warning with rear cross-traffic alert, lane-keeping alert and rear parking sensors with reverse automatic emergency braking.

2021 F-150 Lariat: $46,890

For an extra $10,000 or so, upgrading to the Lariat gives you all the standard XLT content but moves to an extended cab with the 6-foot-5-inch bed and Ford’s turbocharged 2.7-liter EcoBoost V-6.  Power leather front seats are standard on the Lariat, as is dual-zone automatic climate control. The Lariat also gets LED headlights and 18-inch wheels. The most significant upgrade, however, comes with Ford’s new 12-inch touchscreen infotainment system.

2021 F-150 King Ranch: $58,025

For an even larger price bump, the next highest rung on the F-150 ladder is the King Ranch, which comes standard as a crew cab with the short 5-foot-6-inch bed. For V-8 enthusiasts, power comes from Ford’s long-serving 5.0-liter V-8. Upgraded LED headlights flank the King Ranch’s single-bar grille. Inside are more luxurious touches, including additional leather trim, carpeted floormats and a premium Bang & Olufsen stereo. Safety tech also gets an upgrade with Ford Co-Pilot360 Assist 2.0 tech, which includes adaptive cruise control with lane-centering steering and speed sign recognition. The King Ranch also includes a variety of King Ranch-specific exterior and interior touches.

2021 F-150 Platinum: $60,805

Moving even further into luxury truck territory, the Platinum, like the King Ranch, builds on the Lariat with different accoutrements. Those include standard 20-inch wheels, lots of chrome exterior accents and massaging front seats with Platinum-specific interior trim. 

2021 F-150 Limited: $72,520

The highest rung on the F-150’s ladder is the Limited, crossing the $70,000 starting price threshold. Massaging seats? Check. Leather? Obviously. Twenty-inch wheels? Nope, we’ve got 22s here. A V-8? Also, no. Power for the Limited comes from the turbocharged 3.5-liter V-6. Most notable on the Limited is the standard Active Driver Assist Prep Kit, which will enable semi-autonomous, hands-free steering via an over-the-air update once the technology is available in the third quarter of 2021. (Ford is one of just four automakers in the U.S. to offer hands-free steering now or soon; the others are GM, BMW and, soon, Nissan.)

But Wait, There’s More

What’s above is just standard equipment. Adding Ford’s PowerBoost onboard generator will cost $1,900 to $4,495, depending on the standard engine. Other options include the F-150’s FX4 Off-Road Package, Heavy-Duty Payload Package and Max Trailer Tow Package, plus various appearance packages and more.

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