2024 Dodge Charger: The Brotherhood of Muscle Lives On

dodge charger 2024 exterior oem 19 jpg 2024 Dodge Charger | Manufacturer image

Competes with: Tesla Model S, Lucid Air Pure, Ioniq 5 N, BMW i5, Ford Mustang Mach-E GT

Looks like: The 2022 Charger Daytona “Concept” wasn’t actually a concept car at all

Powertrains: Up to 496- (R/T) or 670-horsepower (Scat Pack) dual-motor, battery-electric powertrain or 420- or 550-hp twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter inline-six cylinder gasoline engine; eight-speed automatic transmission (on gas-engine models); all-wheel drive

Hits dealerships: Late summer 2024 (EV), early 2025 (gas versions)

To everyone who thought the demise of the Hemi V-8 at Stellantis would spell the end of Dodge as a performance brand — boy, were you wrong. The production version of the new 2024 Dodge Charger has been unveiled to the world, and if there’s one thing it’s not lacking, it’s crazy numbers meant to help you forget about the much-loved, now-abandoned V-8. There’s a lot to know about the all-new Charger, and it starts with this fun nugget: The Charger Daytona Concept car that the brand first showed to the world in August 2022 was not, in fact, a concept car at all — the thing was damn near totally production intent. That’s what Dodge brand boss Tim Kuniskis told assembled media last week at a preview for the 2024 Charger before showing three production versions of the electric muscle car.

Related: 2025 Dodge Charger: How Does It Compare to the Concept?

The Charger Is a Two-Door Again (And a Four-Door)

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There are going to actually be two body styles for the 2024 Charger: a two-door hatchback coupe and a four-door hatchback sedan. Both versions will share the same 121-inch wheelbase (an inch larger than the outgoing four-door-only ’23 Charger) and a common roofline; only the door openings are different between the two models. The new Charger is wider, taller and longer than the car it replaces. It’s also significantly heavier thanks to the enormous lithium-ion Samsung-sourced battery pack it will have — just over 5,800 pounds, nearly 1,300 pounds more than the heaviest gas-powered V-8 2023 Charger. Oof.

The bodywork is very clearly an homage to the 1968 Charger; that front and rear light treatment and the character line down the body are true giveaways. But the front end also incorporates the R-Wing design seen on the concept car thanks to the design flexibility that electric-vehicle architectures allow. Air flows up through the grille opening and over the hood and roof, which instead of a moonroof, now features an optional fixed full-length glass panel. But that R-Wing front end doesn’t appear on all versions of the Charger because not all versions of the new 2024 Charger will be electric.

Under the Hood

dodge charger 2024 cg exterior oem 12 jpg 2024 Dodge Charger | Manufacturer image

That’s right, there will be both electric and gasoline powertrains in the new Charger. The electric Charger will be known as a Charger Daytona because the look of the R-Wing creates a similar appearance to the “nose cone” that appeared on the original 1969 Charger Daytona. Gas-powered Chargers will be referred to as Charger Sixpacks, and no R-Wing for you — cooling and packaging necessitate a more traditional grille.

The first vehicles produced in summer 2024 will be those with the electric powertrain. The first EV powertrains will be 400-volt systems featuring two motors (one for each axle), making all-wheel drive standard on the ’24 Charger. There will be two versions of the Charger at launch, both two-doors: the R/T and the Scat Pack. The launch versions will have higher-than-stock power output by including Direct Connection Stage upgrade kits right from the factory.

The R/T will put out 496 horsepower and includes a Stage 1 kit, which adds 40 hp to a standard R/T. The launch-version Scat Pack produces 670 hp and includes a Stage 2 kit, adding 80 hp to the lesser standard Scat Pack. Both are augmented by the new PowerShot button on the steering wheel, which adds 40 hp for a 15-second burst — but this 40 hp is also included in the total horsepower figures, meaning that the actual output is 456 hp for the R/T Stage 1 (and 404 pounds-feet of torque) and 630 hp for the Scat Pack Stage 2 (with 627 pounds-feet of torque). Confused yet?

The performance numbers are impressive, however. The R/T can run from 0-60 mph in 4.7 seconds and the quarter-mile in 13.1 seconds, according to Dodge, while the Scat Pack will get to 60 in 3.3 seconds and run the quarter mile in 11.5 seconds. The battery pack is a 100.5-kilowatt-hour unit (with 93.9 kWh usable) shared between both models; Dodge says it provides 317 miles of range for the R/T and 260 miles for the Scat Pack. On a 350-kilowatt DC fast charger, the cars can charge at a peak rate of 183 kW, while its Level 2 charging speed is capable of 11 kW. Dodge says that the pack can be charged from 20% to 80% in under 28 minutes on a DC fast charger, or about 5.5 hours on a 240-volt Level 2 circuit.

If going electric is still not your thing, just wait for early 2025, when the new twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter inline six-cylinder Hurricane engines will be dropped in the Sixpack variants. Two versions will be available: a Standard Output making 420 hp and a High Output version making 550 hp. Both will be mated to a standard eight-speed automatic transmission and AWD. More information about the gas variants will be available closer to their launch date, but we do know that the S.O. engine will only be in the four-door, while the H.O. engine is slated for the two-door.

The rest of the Charger Daytona’s hardware is also impressive. You can get brakes with rotors up to 16 inches, with six-piston Brembo calipers up front and four-pot units out back. The wheels and tires are the largest ever fitted to a Charger: The Charger Daytona Scat Pack with the Track Pack option gets up to 20-inch alloys wrapped in staggered Goodyear Eagle F1 Supercar 3 rubber measuring 305/35ZR20 up front and 325/35ZR20 in the rear. You’ll also get a dual-valve semi-active adaptive suspension for improved body control.

On the Inside

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The 2024 Charger features an all-new interior, as well, and it’s also extremely close to the concept car’s look. Front and center will be a new style of steering wheel; it’s not round, it’s a squircle, and it features a lot of actual buttons that control the displays, drive modes, regenerative braking and more. Beyond it is one of two digital instrument panel displays — either a 10.25-inch unit that’s standard in the R/T or a massive 16-inch display, which is optional in the R/T and standard on the Scat Pack. It’s a freestanding unit with no overhead hood, but Dodge insists that it features extraordinary resolution and true, deep blacks, so light and glare shouldn’t be an issue.

The other display to your right is a touchscreen measuring 12.3 inches and running the Uconnect 5 multimedia system on a new Android-based operating system. Below that is a pistol-grip gear shifter and wireless phone charger. An optional head-up display will be available with a large field of view and extended distance effect, and the Track Package’s new Drive Experience Recorder joins the old Dodge Performance Pages to allow for recording track driving for later playback and dynamic analysis.

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Dodge says the interior is no smaller than the outgoing model and that it will be the same size for either two- or four-door variants. Dimensionally, it’s larger in nearly every way, except for rear-seat legroom, which loses a significant 3 inches; overall passenger room is also down 17 cubic feet (which can easily be due to measurement differences). But what you lose in backseat legroom, you more than make up for in a vast increase to cargo room: All Chargers will be hatchbacks now, providing a huge boost to utility. Total cargo room is up 133% from the old Charger, now measuring 38.5 cubic feet if you drop the rear seatbacks, according to Dodge’s measurements. There’s also a small 1.5-cubic-foot frunk up front, as well.

The interior will also be notably more premium than the one in the outgoing Charger, with a choice of fabrics; black or red Nappa leathers; and either high-backed sport seats with fixed head restraints and pass-throughs on higher-spec variants or low-back seats as standard equipment. Other notable features include the Attitude Adjustment Lighting, a 64-color changeable ambient interior light treatment that also can be set to react to the vehicle’s activity, such as when someone opens a door at night. The curious Fratzonic electronic exhaust is also slated to appear on the Charger Daytonas, using speakers and airflow through tuned chambers to recreate all manner of simulated muscle car engine noises that’s said to be as loud as a Hellcat engine at full chat.

The drive modes have some interesting new features, as well, including the usual Auto, Sport, Eco, Wet/Snow and Track modes. On the Scat Pack, you also get the more unusual Drag mode, as well as the new Drift and Donut modes, a line-lock function for warming up the rear tires at the drag strip and a launch control function.

And of course, like most new cars, a full complement of safety features is now standard on the new Chargers, such as forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking, lane departure steering assist, adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go capability and Active Driving Assist, a semi-autonomous hands-free system that combines adaptive cruise control and lane-centering steering. Optional features include things like 360-degree parking sensors, a surround-view camera, a tire-to-curb camera to prevent wheel damage when parallel parking, among other items.

Timeline of Introductions

Dodge is launching the new Charger in something of a staggered schedule. First off the line from the Windsor, Ontario, manufacturing plant will be a pair of electric coupes in the R/T and Scat Pack trims late this summer. Following in the early first quarter of 2025 will be the four-door electric variants, as well as the gasoline-engine versions of the two- and four-doors (but we don’t know yet what the trims will look like for the gas versions). The Standard Output versions of the electric variants will also start up then, as the launch coupes have the Stage 1 (R/T) and Stage 2 (Scat Pack) outputs. We’re also slated to see the ultimate version of the Charger, the range-topping SRT Banshee, come then, too; it will sport an 800-volt battery architecture, two-speed transmission and speed quite unlike anything even the old Challenger SRT Demon could produce.

No pricing is yet available for the new Chargers, as that’s also coming closer to the vehicles’ on-sale date later this year, but it’s almost assured that these initial electric models will be considerably more expensive than the outgoing gasoline performance versions. 100.5-kWh batteries are not cheap, and with the current prices for such things running well over $100 per kWh, well, you can do the math. If Dodge plans on making them in any way attainable to average consumers, it’s unlikely that they’re going to be initially profitable. We’re just thrilled that the Dodge Brotherhood of Muscle isn’t dead; it seems to have been given quite the electric jumpstart.

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Detroit Bureau Chief Aaron Bragman has had over 25 years of experience in the auto industry as a journalist, analyst, purchasing agent and program manager. Bragman grew up around his father’s classic Triumph sports cars (which were all sold and gone when he turned 16, much to his frustration) and comes from a Detroit family where cars put food on tables as much as smiles on faces. Today, he’s a member of the Automotive Press Association and the Midwest Automotive Media Association. His pronouns are he/him, but his adjectives are fat/sassy. Email Aaron Bragman

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